Everyone who has a chronic illness has several things in common. We are all sick. We all hurt. We all have good days and bad days. But no matter what, the happiest thing we have in common is that we all have little victories that we love to celebrate, and here is where you can share them! I'm 19 years old and suffer from numerous chronic illness. Nothing will be deleted and everything will be published. Feel free to share please! Just hit the submit button on the drop down menu below!

4th April 2014

Link reblogged from Living Through the Pain with 387 notes

If I will show you my illness, I trust you. →

be-ahsan:

If I reach for you, instead of the wall, when I’m about to collapse; I believe you will steady me.

If I ask you to open a bottle for me when my hands are weak, I believe you won’t mock me for not being able to.

If I take my medicine in front of you, I have faith that you won’t pity me for all…

Source: be-ahsan

22nd March 2014

Photo reblogged from The Perfection Deception with 203,352 notes

alwayssmilecuzyoucan:

afangirlstreehouse:

hheath541:

Apple download - https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/aspire-news/id733163167?mt=8
Android download - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.collectiveray.aspire

I’m sorry - not my usual stuff - but this is incredibly important. Please share around. It could save someone’s life.

I DON’T CARE IF THIS DOESN’T SUIT YOUR BLOG TYPE IF YOU DON’T REBLOG THIS I’M JUDGING YOU 

alwayssmilecuzyoucan:

afangirlstreehouse:

hheath541:

Apple download - https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/aspire-news/id733163167?mt=8

Android download - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.collectiveray.aspire

I’m sorry - not my usual stuff - but this is incredibly important. Please share around. It could save someone’s life.

I DON’T CARE IF THIS DOESN’T SUIT YOUR BLOG TYPE IF YOU DON’T REBLOG THIS I’M JUDGING YOU 

Source: hheath541

22nd March 2014

Link reblogged from fibrozombie ♥ with 348 notes

Some Chronic Illness/Disability blogs →

fibrozombie:

chronic-illness-support:

One of these days I will add a bunch!

Source: chronic-illness-support

31st January 2014

Photo reblogged from Short Skirt, Large Sweater with 10 notes

helloelloh:

Couples drawing of a fb friend+new hubby, stole a pic from their wedding album to make this. 

This is me and my husband! She’s an amazing artist and a sweet girl! Follow her :)

helloelloh:

Couples drawing of a fb friend+new hubby, stole a pic from their wedding album to make this. 

This is me and my husband! She’s an amazing artist and a sweet girl! Follow her :)

24th January 2014

Link reblogged from Life With Chronic Illness with 2,598 notes

TIPS FOR DEALING WITH PEOPLE IN PAIN →

polishedinpajamas:

lilbijou:

anothermissinglink:

TIPS FOR DEALING WITH PEOPLE IN PAIN

1. People with chronic pain seem unreliable (we can’t count on ourselves). When feeling better we promise things (and mean it); when in serious pain, we may not even show up.

2. An…

Source:

23rd January 2014

Video reblogged from FogBlogger with 134,326 notes

To anyone who is thinking about killing themselves: please watch this


This is from a girl who’s sister committed suicide. If you are looking for a sign not to commit, this is it.


Please share this so everyone can see.

Source: cliff-whored

23rd January 2014

Post with 30 notes

Hey All,

Sorry I’ve been missing in action for the last little bit - I had my own very exciting victory.

I GOT MARRIED!

image

That’s me and my very happy groom, but you can see the groom’s face better in this picture (this is one of the professional pictures)

image

Also, I have an obsession with roses and white Christmas lights. Since we got married 3 days after Christmas, we had plenty! You can see the church better here.image

But yes. I am now a MRS!

22nd January 2014

Quote reblogged from Just the Little Things--Chronically Ill Style with 74,355 notes

Just because one person’s problem is less traumatic than another’s doesn’t mean they’re required to hurt less.
— J.A. Redmerski, The Edge of Never (via chronically-ill-victories)

Source: simply-quotes

21st January 2014

Post reblogged from Diary Of A Sick Girl with 40 notes

When you look in the mirror, what do you see?

sickgirldiary:

When you look in the mirror, don’t get upset about the dark under-eye circles, acne from side effects, exhaustion from lack of sleep, hair loss, dry skin, swelling, stretch marks and scars on your body. Don’t put yourself down. Walk away from the mirror and try it again, but this time look at yourself through a different perspective. Take a look at yourself with PRIDE. Those stretch marks are marks of strength and fighting power. Those scars are battle marks of moments you have survived and lived to tell about. Superheroes get marks and bruises on them, but do you see how powerful they are? No one ever defeats them. Think of that as you today. You will never be defeated and it’s time you start to see the superhero that is staring back at you in the mirror!

20th January 2014

Question reblogged from A Safe Haven for Spoonies with 63 notes

Anonymous asked: You post a lot of stuff about how disabled people DON'T want to be treated, eg person first language, and I don't think nondisabled people know they're being offensive; they just don't know better. Would you do a post on how disabled people DO like to be treated, for the benefit of your nondisabled followers? I think it would really help us be less offensive.

fogwithwheels:

For the most part I avoid posts like this for the simple reason that disabled people are not a monolith.  I can tell you things that I prefer, but that can be exactly the opposite of what someone else prefers.  Disability is complex, and disability intersects with everything else in life, and we can’t ignore that.  So my experience is only ever going to be my experience, and if I try to act like it’s universal, well, that would be an awful thing for me to do. 

Now, that being said, I can appreciate what you’re asking.  You want more than just “what not to do”, and that’s a good step to make.  Although I would say it’s not about being offensive as much as it is about being oppressive.  And I’m not so sure that people don’t know better.  I mean, people are ignorant, and people are taught ridiculous and awful things, but sometimes, sometimes people do know better.  

Those are points that would make separate posts of their own, and I do mean to answer this to an extent.

So ok, the best suggestion I can make, in terms of doing things, is listening. 

Yes, that’s it, listen. 

I know it seems simple, but I feel like that’s where nondisabled people often loose it.  There is no point in asking for help if you’re not ready to listen to the reply.  Or understand the reply in whatever form it may come.  I actually do appreciate help from people, even the door opening kind, as much as I make fun of it sometimes.  But it does me no good to have someone open a door for me when they stand between me and the door.  So when I tell someone in that situation that I have it, or, excuse me but I will run over your toes, and they insist on standing there, well it gets a little awkward.

So my biggest piece of advice to you, is that if you know a disabled person, or if you meet a disabled person, listen to them.  We’re usually, not always, but usually good at explaining what we need, and explaining the things that happen to us on a regular basis that you might not be used to. 

We also usually know our ways around the places that we go to, we know the safe and accessible routes.  But new places can be unnerving for some because we don’t know the accessibility.  That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t invite disabled people out though, personally, that annoys me, and I know friends who had that happen to them a lot.  If you’re not sure ASK.  Actually, that’s a general thing with disability.  If you’re not sure, and you can do so in a polite way, and you are ok with the person not answering your question, ask.  We’ve been dealing with this stuff, so we likely are able to work something out.  I’m a lot happier if someone says “hey there’s a flight of stairs, but we could help you with them, is that ok?” then, not being invited or arriving and finding surprise stairs. 

This type of asking is not to be confused with the random strangers that ask inappropriate questions, like the cashier at a certain pharmacy who asks me about “my condition” every time I go there and I now won’t go back because it’s awkward.  That’s not ok.  Asking me where the best place to park the car, or how to fold my walker, or something like that, that’s fine. 

The important thing, and this is my personal opinion, is to treat us like people, but not to forget about our disabilities or the fact that society is often not accessible.  You can still see my disability and treat me as a person and this doesn’t have to be a contradiction.  It’s important to be aware of my disability because it does impact my life.  And it’s important to be aware of how things aren’t accessible, because that also impacts my life. 

If a random disabled person on the street looks like they need help, they might need help.  I would just recommend asking first, and listen to what they tell you because there could be a lot of things going on that you are not aware of, or aren’t visible. 

So really, all I can really emphasize is be willing to listen to what disabled people are telling you, however they are able to say it. 

That’s the most important point I can make here.  Because every person and every situation is going to be different. 

But if you are willing to listen to what disabled people are saying in those situations, that’s going to be a good start.

Source: fogwithwheels